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Author Topic: how many seeds per pod?  (Read 2357 times)
natureboy68
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« on: October 21, 2009, 05:43:14 PM »

if this has been answered somewhere else my apologies, i couldn't find it...when replanting pods how many seeds per sponge do you use? lettuce herbs, tomatoes, etc...how come you don't thin to one plant per pod?
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« on: October 21, 2009, 05:43:14 PM »

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bab43
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2009, 05:56:08 PM »

It sounds like you're going to be wanting to do your own grows rather than go with the kits, so the Master Gardener Guide will be useful to you.  It's on the AeroGrow site, second last section near the bottom on "http://www.aerogrow.com/community/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=184".

Top of page 8 addresses number of seeds.  In the AG kits I've normally had 4 basil plants per pod for example and I'm quite sure the lettuce had 6.  The tomato and pepper kits do have extra seeds to guarantee germination but only one is kept.

So you do thin down for some plants, such as tomatoes and peppers, covered at the bottom of page 18.  Most are not thinned.

Hope this helps.

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Marianne

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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2009, 09:34:52 AM »

For basils and most herbs, I use about 6-7 seeds per pod. If all sprout, I thin down to 1-2 per pod.   For Chives, I use more - about 10-12 per pod, and I leave them all in the pod.  For toms, and peppers, I use 4 - and then leave only 1 after germination (I use the other sprouts in an empty split apart pod - so not to waste them).  For lettuces and the bok choy I am growing now, I put about 10-12 (they are small to see), and thin to about 6-7.  I have had good luck so far, and will post my tom pics later today.  Good luck to you - and the members here are the absolute best with hydroponic know-how.  I have learned a bunch in just 1 year from here. You will like it here.
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Carolyn
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Jayli
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« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2009, 11:57:54 AM »

I haven't actually tried this w/ the AG b/c I haven't yet sown my own seeds (I will be doing this in the next week), but I use this techinique every time I start seeds for my garden and have great success.

Pre-start the seeds before you sow by wetting a paper towel, carefully place several seeds in a grid-like formation, fold paper towel over, place inside open plastic bag, and wait about 2-3 days.  Once they are sprouted, plant.  when planting in soil, I just tear the paper towel and plant the whole thing b/c the paper will decompose.  in the AG, I would probably open up the paper towel and use tweezers to carefully deposit sprout.  Some instructions say that you should plant as soon as any sprouting is visible but I've actually had better success when I've waited a little longer and the sprout was bigger.  if you wait, though, the sprout may be intertwined w/ the paper and harder to remove.

The advantage to this is (1) you only plant a viable seed (no need to plant multiple seeds and thin) and (2) you jump start the germination process so the plant grows faster.  this is a standard practice for seeds like carrot that have long germination period.

not sure how many sprouts to put in each pod.  ideally, only one plant per pod, regardless of what the seed kits do.  I've grown lettuce doubled up outside and have found that they don't grow as nicely as the single sowed seed.  the leaves are smaller and the overall plant is smaller.  if I'm in a rush to get a lot of lettuce though, and want to harvest baby leaves, I'd put in two sprouted seeds just to make sure.  Since I have lettuce growing outside and will be seeding the 7 pod, I will probably first just try to grow one sprouted seed per pod.

fyi - if you are sowing different types of lettuce, they have different germination times, so your planting will be staggered by a few days.
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shane arthur
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« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2009, 03:13:32 PM »

Kudos for the tips! Your method will work just fine in an ag, I have transplanted seedlings many times while growing tomatoes. Its much easier to work with seedlings because you already have a plant to work with. For the record, i use three seeds in each pod and trim to one seedling on tomatoes.
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« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2009, 07:02:39 PM »

The peppers I'm growing now in the "Marbles" thread (in the Photos and Glogs section) are from an entire pack of seeds.  I put maybe 6 or 7 in each pod, and used the nutrients and pods from the Master Gardener Kit. 

Almost ALL the seeds sprouted, and I emptied 3 pods out of 7 of their seeds and replanted them in dirt.

They all died because I just can't keep up with the maintenance  Sad  So i sort of regret taking them out and replanting them.

The remaining pods, I haven't thinned out at all, though as Shane says, it's usually good to thin tomatoes and peppers out to one plant per pod. 

They're ALL doing great in spite of that, so I wonder sometimes if thinning is really necessary.  I will try the same thing (NOT thinning) again maybe with cherry tomatoes. 

I figure if it ain't broke, don't fix it!   Grin
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